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Breakfast Briefings

Abstract sunrise

Great Swamp Watershed Association’s (GSWA) Breakfast Briefing speakers series returns for spring on March 11, 2014!

Support for the Spring 2014 Breakfast Briefing series comes from Investors Bank of Madison located at 16 Waverly Place in Madison, NJ.

Our seasonal Breakfast Briefing series was developed to help busy professionals stay informed about community environmental issues without taking valuable time away from work or family life. Presentations are kept brief, focus on current environmental topics, and minimize overlap with most traditional business hours. These lecture-and-discussion events are usually held on the second Tuesday of the month from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Exceptions to this schedule are noted in the event descriptions below, so please read them carefully.

Seating is limited, so we ask that you pre-register for each event by clicking the Register for this Event link below its description, or from our Event Registration page, or call 973-538-3500 x22.

GSWA members participate free of charge. Nonmembers are asked to make a voluntary donation of $10/adult and $5/child (6 to 17 years old), or $35/family (includes 4). There is no suggested donation for children 5 years and under. Programs are suitable for all ages. For updates or cancellations, please call our Event Information Hotline at 973-538-3500 x22.

Tuesday, March 11, 8—9:30 a.m.

GSWA Office, 568 Tempe Wick Rd., Morristown, NJ

Pro Tips for a Healthier Lawn and a Healthier Environment

Credit: istockphoto.com/nspimages

Credit:
istockphoto.com/nspimages

It’s more than just cutting the grass! Lawn care is the topic for this timely, early spring discussion. We will help you learn all the best management practices you need to know if you want to develop some beautiful, environmentally sensitive turf outside your home.

Peter Coviello of Madison-based Coviello Brothers Horticultural Services will be our lawn care expert. The Coviello family has been providing landscaping services in our region for more than 40 years. Peter’s presentation will tap into those decades of experience by showing how poor landscaping practices, poor product choices, and poor irrigation habits can hurt local water quality, and waste your hard-earned money and resources. Come armed with your own lawn care and irrigation questions and we will do our best to get you some answers during “Ask Pete!” — a special Q&A session we have created just for this event!

Register for this event.

 

Tuesday, April 8, 8 - 9:30 a.m.

GSWA Office, 568 Tempe Wick Rd., Morristown, NJ

The Last Eight Miles: Cleaning Up the Lower Passaic River

NJDEP 2002 Land use/Land cover Update, Lower Passaic, Saddle Watershed Management Area, WMA-4, Edition 20080304. Credit: New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), Office of Information Resources Management (OIRM), Bureau of Geographic Information Systems (BGIS).

NJDEP 2002 Land use/Land cover
Update, Lower Passaic, Saddle
Watershed Management Area,
WMA-4, Edition 20080304. Credit:
New Jersey Department of
Environmental Protection (NJDEP),
Office of Information Resources
Management (OIRM), Bureau of
Geographic Information Systems
(BGIS).

Revitalizing communities and restoring waterways are top priorities for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Here in New Jersey, the agency is developing a plan to restore a 17-mile stretch of the lower Passaic River where river sediments laden with PCBs, dioxins, pesticides, mercury, and other hazardous substances pose a significant threat to public health and wildlife populations.

David Kluesner, team leader for community affairs from EPA Region 2, will join us to discuss EPA’s upcoming proposal to clean up the last eight miles of the tidal Passaic — a stretch of river running from the Newark/Belleville border to Newark Bay. Within the larger 17-mile area of concern, nearly 85% of contaminated surface sediment already identified is located along the river’s final eight-mile stretch. David’s presentation will review some of the major challenges EPA faces as it develops a cleanup plan that is capable of addressing important issues centered urban water degradation, environmental justice, and legal compliance. Community involvement will play a critical role in shaping the final approach to cleanup, and proposed environmental interventions will soon be opened to public comment and review.  Decision-making on a final cleanup plan is tentatively scheduled for late 2014.

Register for this event.


 

Tuesday, May 20, 8 - 9:30 a.m.

Location: Kemmerer Library, 19 Blue Mill Road , Harding Township, NJ

What Can Wildlife Tell Us About Our Water?

Dr. Lee Pollock. May 2010. Credit: GSWA

Did you know that bugs, worms, mollusks and other small, spineless creatures can tell us a lot about how clean our water is? Known as macroinvertebrates in scientific circles, the presence or absence of these little critters in our rivers, lakes, and streams serves as an indicator of local water quality and environmental health.

Dr. Lee Pollock, Professor Emeritus of Biology at Drew University, has studied populations of macroinvertebrates in New Jersey’s Great Swamp region for many years. Join us to hear about findings from his 2013 macroinvertebrate studies, and hear his perspective on the long-term environmental trends they reveal.

Participation is free for all, however voluntary donations to the Great Swamp Watershed Association are sincerely appreciated.

Register for this event.

 

Tuesday, June 10, 8 - 9:30 a.m.

GSWA Office, 568 Tempe Wick Rd., Morristown, NJ

Mapping Inland Floods

Floodwaters from Hurricane Irene (2011) innundate a gas station in Wayne Township, NJ. Credit: flickr.com/photos/imprint777.

Floodwaters from Hurricane Irene
innundate a gas station in Wayne
Township, NJ.
Credit: flickr.com/photos/imprint777.

Tom Suro, an hydrologist and surface water specialist with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) New Jersey Water Science Center, will discuss his work on a pilot project designed to map inland flooding in the Passaic River Basin. This presentation will offer important information about flooding and flood dynamics for all New Jersey residents living along the western and northern reaches of the Passaic River and its tributary streams.

Register for this event.


 

View presentations from some past Breakfast Briefings:

The Economic Implications of Climate Change, Professor Joseph J. Seneca, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University, Tuesday, December 13, 2012

Why Is New Jersey’s Weather Changing? (presentation (pdf)) (video — as you watch, please turn up the volume. Audio quality is complicated by our presentation space.) Anthony Broccoli, director of the Rutgers Center for Environmental Predication, Tuesday, April 10, 2012

The State of the Passaic River, Kirk R. Barrett, Director, Passaic River Institute, Montclair State University, Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Every Drop Counts, David Robinson, NJ State Climatologist, Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Citizen Science — What’s In It For You?, Danielle Donkersloot, NJDEP’s Volunteer Monitoring Coordinator, Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Climate Change and You… Perfect Together?, Dr. Michael Kennish, Rutgers University, Tuesday, November 11, 2008