ACROSS THE WATERSHED BLOG

CREDIT: Ari Kaufman
Mar 19

Join Spotted Turtle Society

You’ve supported us for years. Decades, maybe. Your simple act of support has been the foundation of our success for almost 40 years. Now, we’re asking for another simple action- be our friend!

Help GSWA grow with these changing times. By joining the Spotted Turtle Society, you are giving us access to a valuable resource: your attitudes, thoughts, and values!

Now that GSWA is expanding our reach, we cannot assume that a one-size-fits-all approach can best provide support to residents along the Passaic. We have seen how buffer zones diminish considerably as we follow the river downstream. Does the lack of green space affect people’s attitudes about the environment? We’d love to know. This is a survey program for members. Our goal is to reach 100 members to kick off the program. Once that happens, you will receive an e-mail with some conclusions about the topic and a link to the next survey.

What do we hope to learn?

Any number of things. If we discover we have an inordinate number of birders among our members, we would offer you better birding programs. Perhaps you’re interested in more citizen science initiatives or ways you can constructively communicate to your towns about issues that matter to you. We’re here to listen.

Why a Spotted Turtle?

Spotted turtles are endemic reptiles to the Great Swamp and other deciduous wetlands in the North East. They are common enough
that changes in their population can tell us a great deal about the environmental health of their habitat. They are resilient problem solvers, long-lived, and have a long memory. The key to their success so far is their adaptability and variability.

Spotted Turtle at GSNWR by Jim Gilbert

Just visit Greatswamp.org/sts and start by filling out our first survey.
All results and e-mails are strictly confidential, we will never publish any identifying details about a participant. Looking forward to hearing from you all.

Questions? E-mail Kristina at Knecovska@greatswamp.org